Silhouette Art – What & Why?

IMG_5217 IMG_5218

At the studio, we use silhouettes as a teaching tool for a variety of skills. Not only is this task simple enough for ages 5+, it is beautiful and teaches a lot. I’m going to give you the steps to make your own silhouette art and below I’ve outlined the skills you will acquire along the way!

Skill number 1: Simplifying an object. This sounds easy but it really can be difficult. You want to focus on the bare basics of your subject. Start by analyzing what are the most important and identifiable details about the subject. Once you have recognized those, you can start there. Not focusing on too much small detail. See the big picture.

Skill number 2: Drawing what you actually see. Most people have a set image in their head when they think of the item they are drawing. The key to a successful silhouette is erasing all preconceived notions of the object you are portraying. You need to be able to draw what you are actually seeing in front of your eyes. This way, your drawing will be easily identified after you have turned it into a silhouette.

Skill number 3: Lighting. Learning how to paint a silhouette and about the illusion you are creating can give insight into how you can use lighting to create a realistic work of art. By painting your image in complete black with an illuminated background this will give you a clue about where your light source is located and how that relates to shadows and colors.

Now you know the why, here is the what —->

STEP ONE: Think about your silhouette and come up with a sketch. Maybe it is something you can see in the room or something you have designed yourself. Sketch Sketch Sketch

STEP TWO: After you have your sketch complete you need to create a colorful background. Think about the silhouette you are making. What type of background would make sense? It is important that you pick a color scheme that makes sense and is appealing. *Use acrylic or watercolor paints for the background* LET DRY

20151014_172153

Above: Gracie being awesome 🙂

STEP THREE: Lightly sketch your silhouette over your dried background. Begin to use the black paint to color the silhouette image. Be sure to paint a ground and don’t be afraid of creative flare!

Your finished product should be colorful and make a cool illusion, just like Gracie’s.

20151014_173408

Cats Rule!

Visit our website at http://www.feelartistic.org

Advertisements

Clay Roses – Made Easy

Hand building with clay can be a tricky thing! It can be messy, but also lots of fun. One simple lesson we use to introduce the hand building process is clay roses. You can make them in any size and thickness and are a wonderful way to get used to the feel and malleability of stoneware clay.

First thing we do is pinch off and roll up different sized balls of clay, going biggest to smallest. Once you have them ready, flatten them out like the picture below.

IMG_4680

TOP: Step 1 BOTTOM: Step 2

Each flattened out clay ball is a rose petal. Next, you will place each petal slightly on top of the one next to it. Once every “petal” is touching, you start to roll the rose.

START WITH THE SMALLEST PETAL FIRST – roll smallest to largest.

Once you have all of the petals completely rolled in to each other you can pinch off any extra clay at the bottom of the rose. Sometimes it gets bulky towards the bottom and you can pinch to taper off the edge.

After you have your rose coiled you can smooth out any edges and make leaves to apply from the bottom. It sounds more complicated than it is!

Here is an example.

IMG_4685

After it is dried, it’s glazed and put in the kiln.

We love it and kids love it, roses made easy 🙂

Visit us at http://www.feelartistic.org

Camara Obscura: A Drawing Technique

I use a Renaissance era technique, referred as ‘Camera Obscura’ at my studio. This techniques helps my students to identify lines and shadows. By looking into camera, they can easily sketch an image of the scene onto a piece of paper to create a realistic drawing. The idea behind this exercise is not to copy an image but to learn how to see an object and recognize outlines and shadows which will eventually help them build perspective and to create a realistic, detailed drawing in their artwork.

My students love this process of learning. In picture below, a girl is drawing a pear and a cube by looking into a camera.

IMG_20151003_134641

Visit our studio at http://www.feelartistic.org

Welcome to FEELartistic Studio, Art Instructor – Annie Anderson!

Hello! My name is Annie Anderson, the newest art instructor at FEELartistic Studio. I have a Studio Art degree from Florida Atlantic University and moved here this Summer ’15. I have a huge passion for art and was an Elementary Art Teacher K-6 in Florida before I moved here. I also have a huge passion for kids, which is why I love this job!!

I will be using this blog to post updates on studio life and show off all the hard work that goes on around here. I’ll be posting step by step lesson plans and progress pictures in case you’re interested in duplicating it or are just curious as to what we are learning! I hope this helps you feel artistic.

Happy blogging 🙂

annie