About JG

Fine artist and art instructor at FEElartistic Studio

Collaborative Art Project with Special Needs Students @FEELartistic

“Diversity is the mix. Inclusion is making the mix work.” -Andres Tapia Education is essential to a functioning society, its main objective is to prepare students for the real world. One thing we c…

Source: Collaborative Art Project with Special Needs Students @FEELartistic

Camara Obscura: A Drawing Technique

I use a Renaissance-era technique, referred to as ‘Camera Obscura’ at my studio. This technique helps my students to identify lines and shadows. By looking into the camera, they can easily sketch an image of the scene onto a piece of paper to create a realistic drawing. The idea behind this exercise is not to copy an image but to learn how to see an object and recognize outlines and shadows which will eventually help them build perspective and to create a realistic, detailed drawing in their artwork.

My students love this process of learning. In the picture below, a girl is drawing a pear and a cube by looking into a camera.

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Visit our studio at http://www.feelartistic.org

Art Therapy Benefits

Art Therapy Benefits For The Average Person

By expressing yourself through art, an art therapist can help you see things about yourself that you otherwise may not have comprehended. Art therapists can help you process emotions and feelings that you are struggling with, so you can begin healing. Since art therapists are trained in the arts and, obviously, in therapy, they are capable of guiding you through the process of creative expression. They are also quite capable of providing insight into your creations and helping you understand certain aspects of yourself that maybe you didn’t know existed, whether good or bad.

It is this idea of self-exploration that can often lead a person to some insightful conclusions about themselves. Don’t be surprised if the effects of art therapy lead to a general sense of relief and overall better mental health. Again, it’s therapy, but with a completely different ingredient than most people are used to, art.

It’s important to note that you don’t need an art therapist to reap the benefits of art therapy. If you go into art as therapy and learn about the basic concepts and ideas that it represents, then you can learn a lot about yourself through your own isolated creative expression. It’s something you can do on your own to just relieve stress, discover yourself in new ways, etc. It’s also something you can do with other people. It’s truly a beautiful thing when you’re sharing art in an open, friendly, loving environment with other people that are on the same wave.

For more information visit

Benefits of Art Therapy

Art History and Criticism: Learning About Da Vinci -Pat Knepley

“A picture is worth a thousand words.”

You’ve heard that familiar phrase. Perhaps you’ve said it yourself. In today’s highly visual culture, the importance of the visual arts in the total human experience cannot be overstated. Integrating art into the standard academic curriculum is a necessity!

It is fairly common to think of the visual arts as paintings or drawings we might see hung on a museum wall. But an appreciation of art is so much more! We are surrounded by shapes, space, texture, and color. Everything in the average American home has an art element to it, namely, design: the pattern in the wallpaper or curtain fabric, the shape of the lamp, the candlestick, even the teakettle. And of course there are things on the walls: photos in frames, paintings or prints, perhaps even a sculptural piece. Although our tastes in design will vary widely, we all appreciate the beauty of a well-designed object. Who doesn’t like the classic lines of the 1965 Ford Mustang? Pure art.

So, then, the question becomes, Why should the home educator include the study of art as part of the core classical curriculum? Answer: Because all of humanity through the ages has used the arts to tell us stories about every aspect of the lives of the people—the culture, the nation, the history, the beliefs. A general understanding of what is involved in art education is probably more valuable to the homeschooler than any artistic talent.

According to one prominent approach to the study of art, Discipline-Based Arts Education (DBAE), there are four components to a well thought-out art program: art history, art criticism, art production, and aesthetics. Home educators should consider all of these components as being equally valuable when they think of teaching “art,” as intimidating as that might be. In this article we will cover the first two components: art history and art criticism, and finish up with the last two in February.

The best way to explain how to encompass all four disciplines is to use a familiar piece of art. Let’s look at Leonardo Da Vinci’s famous fresco, “The Last Supper.”

Art History 

Leonardo Da Vinci was the quintessential Renaissance man of the late fifteenth century. He thought of himself as primarily an artist, but Da Vinci was also a mathematician, inventor, scientist, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. Da Vinci spent his younger years as an apprentice to a master artist and increased in skill and recognition. 

Later on, Da Vinci was asked by his wealthy benefactor to paint a fresco to decorate the refectory (dining hall) in the monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie. Da Vinci worked on this project from 1495 to 1498. Even though Da Vinci was a great painter, he was constantly experimenting with his materials, so this project took a long time! For centuries, frescoes had been painted by mixing tempera or watercolor paint into the wet plaster of a wall, which required the artist to work quickly before the plaster dried. But Leonardo tried tempera, watercolor, and even oil-based paint on dry plaster in order to get more detail, which took more time. The problem was that this experimental technique really didn’t work, and the paint began to flake off very shortly after the piece was completed.

In the 1600s, someone felt it would be allowable to cut a door through the wall that contained the Da Vinci fresco; consequently, the portion of the original painting that portrayed Jesus’ feet and a portion of the table were lost forever! Over the centuries, a series of artists, seeing that Da Vinci’s original brilliant color was flaking off, tried to preserve the masterpiece by painting over the original, but those efforts failed. 

Then, during World War II, a bomb nearly destroyed the monastery. The refectory suffered a lot of damage, but amazingly, the wall with the fresco sustained only minor damage. Over the ensuing years, rain and water damage to the thinner, repaired walls caused mold to grow on the fresco.

After all those years of misfortune, the most famous painting in the world was in serious trouble. So in 1999 a twenty-year restoration was initiated in order to restore the “Last Supper” to Leonardo Da Vinci’s original vision. Most of the layers of additional paint from other artists have been carefully removed, and we can now see the fresco as close to its original state as is possible.

A suggestion for the home educator is to include this art history perspective about “The Last Supper” in a unit of study on the Renaissance or the role of the church in world history. 

Art Criticism 

Art criticism simply involves talking about art. The viewer will try to get inside the head of the artist and ask questions such as “What was the artist trying to say?” and look at the artwork with a critical eye as it relates to application of the seven art elements: line, shape, space, value, color, texture, and form. But the viewer should also look within himself and ask why he likes or dislikes this particular work. 

Being able to talk about a piece of artwork and make it personal is a good way to increase critical thinking skills. There are ample opportunities to connect art to everyday learning. A basic understanding of the seven art elements and the five design principles (balance, proportion, rhythm, emphasis, and unity) can offer a great way to dive into a conversation when your son admires the graphics in a new game or your daughter gushes over a fabric design and texture. 

It was during the era of the Renaissance that artists discovered the principles of linear and aerial perspective to bring more realism to their works. Da Vinci pioneered the use of one-point perspective to provide a strong focal point with his sacred subject matter. For example, when looking at “The Last Supper,” one immediately notices the strong perspective that Da Vinci employed in order to direct the viewer’s attention to the head of Jesus. Lines that would follow a path to the point where the ceiling meets the floor, in addition to the lines created by the top of the tapestries on the wall, create a strong vanishing point right at the head of Jesus. 

Da Vinci also used geometry to arrange the rest of the composition. All of the twelve disciples are clumped in groups of three to form four triangles on the sides of the table. This can be a fun exercise for kids: Print copies of the image of “The Last Supper” and have your students use a marker to draw shapes to identify geometric aspects of Da Vinci’s composition: the strong linear perspective and symmetrical balance. 

This compelling fresco captures the moment in Scripture when Jesus is with His disciples at His last meal and has just said, “I tell you the truth: one of you will betray me.” Christ’s men are dumbfounded, responding with “Surely, not I, Lord!” The personality of each of the disciples can be ascertained by the facial expression and body language that Da Vinci was careful to individualize. It truly is an amazing work of art.

As you can tell, there is a lot you can learn about art without ever touching a pencil. Next month we’ll continue our assessment of “The Last Supper” by utilizing the two remaining components of discipline-based art education: aesthetics and art production. You don’t want to miss it!

P.S. Want to try a brief lesson on perspective with your students?  Watch this video,  and grab a pencil, a ruler and a piece of paper!

Copyright 2012, used with permission. All rights reserved by author. Originally appeared in the January 2012 issue of The Old Schoolhouse® Magazine, the trade magazine for homeschool families. Read the magazine free at www.TOSMagazine.com or read it on the go and download the free apps at www.TOSApps.com to read the magazine on your mobile devices.

Pat Knepley has been drawing and painting since she was able to hold a crayon. Pat has a degree in art education, a teaching credential, and is an experienced teacher. In addition to being the master artist for the See the Light ART CLASS DVD series, Pat serves as Director of Children’s Ministries at a large church where she is blessed to be able to blend her passions for art, teaching, and reaching kids with God’s Word. Pat lives in Southern California with her husband and two teen boys.

Henna 101: Art of temporary tattooing

Art of Henna 101 for beginners: (The art of temporary tattooing).

Fees: $49.00 for two hour session. (All supplies included).

Participants age: 14+

Henna is a flowering plant and the sole species of the Lawsonia genus. Historically, henna was used for cosmetic purposes in Ancient Egypt, as well as other parts of North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, the Near East and South Asia. Bridal henna nights remain an important custom in many of these areas, particularly among traditional families. 

In this class, instructor will teach how to apply Henna for decorating hands and other parts of body. Join us  to all about the art of henna in a fun & relaxed studio atmosphere packed with hands-on education and experience.

Common Question:

What is Henna art? Henna is an art of temporary tattooing. 

Is Henna safe? YES, henna is absolutely safe!  We only use handmade natural henna that is mixed with organic henna powder, lemon juice, sugar, and pure lavender and tea tree essential oils.

What color will it be? Henna color will be an orange in the beginning.  It will gets darkening to a brown or reddish brown color. The hands and feet will give you the darkest color. 

How long does it last? Normally, you can expect 10-12 days with solid good color and and after that it will starts fading out. 

Does Henna have to be on my hands or feet? Henna can be apply anywhere on the body. But in this class we will use Henna on hands and feet only. 

What is class size? We keep small group of 5 to 10 participants           

How to register for class? Reserve your seat today at Henna Art Session

Contact us for more question or call us at 425-939-1550

The Importance of Art in Child Development:

In recent years, school curricula in the United States have shifted heavily toward common core subjects of reading and math, but what about the arts? Although some may regard art education as a luxury, simple creative activities are some of the building blocks of child development. Learning to create and appreciate visual aesthetics may be more important than ever to the development of the next generation of children as they grow up.

Developmental Benefits of Art

Motor Skills: Many of the motions involved in making art, such as holding a paintbrush or scribbling with a crayon, are essential to the growth of fine motor skills in young children. According to the National Institutes of Health, developmental milestones around age three should include drawing a circle and beginning to use safety scissors. Around age four, children may be able to draw a square and begin cutting straight lines with scissors. Many preschool programs emphasize the use of scissors because it develops the dexterity children will need for writing.

Language Development: For very young children, making art—or just talking about it—provides opportunities to learn words for colors, shapes and actions. When toddlers are as young as a year old, parents can do simple activities such as crumpling up paper and calling it a “ball.” By elementary school, students can use descriptive words to discuss their own creations or to talk about what feelings are elicited when they see different styles of artwork.

Decision Making: According to a report by Americans for the Arts, art education strengthens problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. The experience of making decisions and choices in the course of creating art carries over into other parts of life. “If they are exploring and thinking and experimenting and trying new ideas, then creativity has a chance to blossom,” says MaryAnn Kohl, an arts educator and author of numerous books about children’s art education.

Visual Learning: Drawing, sculpting with clay and threading beads on a string all develop visual-spatial skills, which are more important than ever. Even toddlers know how to operate a smart phone or tablet, which means that even before they can read, kids are taking in visual information. This information consists of cues that we get from pictures or three-dimensional objects from digital media, books and television.

“Parents need to be aware that children learn a lot more from graphic sources now than in the past,” says Dr. Kerry Freedman, Head of Art and Design Education at Northern Illinois University. “Children need to know more about the world than just what they can learn through text and numbers. Art education teaches students how to interpret, criticize, and use visual information, and how to make choices based on it.” Knowledge about the visual arts, such as graphic symbolism, is especially important in helping kids become smart consumers and navigate a world filled with marketing logos.

Inventiveness: When kids are encouraged to express themselves and take risks in creating art, they develop a sense of innovation that will be important in their adult lives. “The kind of people society needs to make it move forward are thinking, inventive people who seek new ways and improvements, not people who can only follow directions,” says Kohl. “Art is a way to encourage the process and the experience of thinking and making things better!”

Cultural Awareness: As we live in an increasingly diverse society, the images of different groups in the media may also present mixed messages. “If a child is playing with a toy that suggests a racist or sexist meaning, part of that meaning develops because of the aesthetics of the toy—the color, shape, texture of the hair,” says Freedman. Teaching children to recognize the choices an artist or designer makes in portraying a subject helps kids understand the concept that what they see may be someone’s interpretation of reality.

Improved Academic Performance: Studies show that there is a correlation between art and other achievement. A report by Americans for the Arts states that young people who participate regularly in the arts (three hours a day on three days each week through one full year) are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, to participate in a math and science fair or to win an award for writing an essay or poem than children who do not participate.

By Grace Hwang Lynch

For more information visit:  http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/music-arts/the-importance-of-art-in-child-development

The Importance of Art in Child Development:

FEELartistic Studio

Image

 

In recent years, school curricula in the United States have shifted heavily toward common core subjects of reading and math, but what about the arts? Although some may regard art education as a luxury, simple creative activities are some of the building blocks of child development. Learning to create and appreciate visual aesthetics may be more important than ever to the development of the next generation of children as they grow up.

Developmental Benefits of Art

Motor Skills: Many of the motions involved in making art, such as holding a paintbrush or scribbling with a crayon, are essential to the growth of fine motor skills in young children. According to the National Institutes of Health, developmental milestones around age three should include drawing a circle and beginning to use safety scissors. Around age four, children may be able to draw a square and begin cutting straight lines with…

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