Silhouette Art – What & Why?

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At the studio, we use silhouettes as a teaching tool for a variety of skills. Not only is this task simple enough for ages 5+, it is beautiful and teaches a lot. I’m going to give you the steps to make your own silhouette art and below I’ve outlined the skills you will acquire along the way!

Skill number 1: Simplifying an object. This sounds easy but it really can be difficult. You want to focus on the bare basics of your subject. Start by analyzing what are the most important and identifiable details about the subject. Once you have recognized those, you can start there. Not focusing on too much small detail. See the big picture.

Skill number 2: Drawing what you actually see. Most people have a set image in their head when they think of the item they are drawing. The key to a successful silhouette is erasing all preconceived notions of the object you are portraying. You need to be able to draw what you are actually seeing in front of your eyes. This way, your drawing will be easily identified after you have turned it into a silhouette.

Skill number 3: Lighting. Learning how to paint a silhouette and about the illusion you are creating can give insight into how you can use lighting to create a realistic work of art. By painting your image in complete black with an illuminated background this will give you a clue about where your light source is located and how that relates to shadows and colors.

Now you know the why, here is the what —->

STEP ONE: Think about your silhouette and come up with a sketch. Maybe it is something you can see in the room or something you have designed yourself. Sketch Sketch Sketch

STEP TWO: After you have your sketch complete you need to create a colorful background. Think about the silhouette you are making. What type of background would make sense? It is important that you pick a color scheme that makes sense and is appealing. *Use acrylic or watercolor paints for the background* LET DRY

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Above: Gracie being awesome 🙂

STEP THREE: Lightly sketch your silhouette over your dried background. Begin to use the black paint to color the silhouette image. Be sure to paint a ground and don’t be afraid of creative flare!

Your finished product should be colorful and make a cool illusion, just like Gracie’s.

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Cats Rule!

Visit our website at http://www.feelartistic.org

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Camara Obscura: A Drawing Technique

I use a Renaissance era technique, referred as ‘Camera Obscura’ at my studio. This techniques helps my students to identify lines and shadows. By looking into camera, they can easily sketch an image of the scene onto a piece of paper to create a realistic drawing. The idea behind this exercise is not to copy an image but to learn how to see an object and recognize outlines and shadows which will eventually help them build perspective and to create a realistic, detailed drawing in their artwork.

My students love this process of learning. In picture below, a girl is drawing a pear and a cube by looking into a camera.

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Visit our studio at http://www.feelartistic.org

Keeping Kids Safe at Summer Camp

From nature walks to cookouts to sing-a-longs — camp has many fun and exciting things to offer kids freed from school and homework during the long, hot summer months.

But before packing your child off to camp, you should get to know what medical and safety services are available — or not, as the case may be.

For starters, according to recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics, a good camp will have written health policies and protocols. And all children attending the camp should be required to have had a complete exam by a doctor in the past year and be up-to-date on all childhood shots.

Before camp starts, parents should make sure the leaders have a detailed health history of their child, including any significant illnesses, operations, injuries,allergies, and any current medical problems.

“A lot of camps have a nurse or other medical person on-site. That would be an important question to ask when looking at camps — what kind of medical support do they have, and is there a place where kids can go if they don’t feel well,” says Garry Gardner, MD, a pediatrician in private practice in Darien, Ill., and a member of the academy’s national panel on injury and poison prevention. 

“Most camps, I would think, would have first-aid supplies on the premises — but that’s a valid question as well. How do they stock the first-aid or the medical office or clinic?”

And not every problem is a physical illness or injury — you also might want to know how the camp handles outbreaks of homesickness.

Eight out of 10 campers report being homesick at least one day at camp, according to American Camping Association statistics. The good news: Less than 10% of those cases are so serious — the child becomes so anxious or depressed that he stops eating or sleeping — that they are sent home.

What, Exactly, Will Your Kid Be Doing?

Gardner says parents should also ask questions about activities available at a potential camp. If your child will be involved in boating, swimming, or other water sports, for example, you’ll want to know about such things as life jackets, supervision, and the CPR certification of instructors.

Another reason to ask about activities: if your child has specific allergies.

For instance, parents of children with allergies to horses will want to know if campers will be taken horseback riding or exposed to horses on nature walks. If necessary, parents should send along Benadryl or Epi-pens for children who could suffer a serious attack if exposed to a known allergen, such as a bee sting, Gardner says.

Some camps may provide these things, but it can’t hurt to send your own supplies just in case.

While parents probably will not be told about every cut, scrape, or bruise their child gets at camp, they will want to familiarize themselves with the procedure in place to deal with a serious situation, such as a broken bone or an illness. This is particularly important for parents whose children attend camps far from home

By 
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Dominique Walton, MD

For more information visit http://www.webmd.com/baby/features/keeping-kids-safe-at-summer-camp

Animation camps for kids

Animation camps for kids at FEElartistic Studio

art classes and summer camps for kids

Jump start Animation Camps: This camps is for kids who are interested in making movies but don’t know how or where to begin. They will all about selected animation programs. These program will help them jump start their creativity. End of the program they will know which tools use and how to make movies. After the camp they can continue their journey from home computer

Clay Animations:

Combine the power of clay sculpting and magic of green screen with stop animation in most exciting way. This camp is for kids who are interested in making movies but don’t know how or where to begin.

Let’s join us to create your first stop animation movie.

In this camp students will learn:

1)    How to develop 3D character / model using Clay.

2)    How to use “Green Screen”.

3)    How to Draw and import shapes for background and masking

4)    What is voiceover and how to records and add in movie

5)    How to add titles

6)    Exporting movies and make it available to view.

 

Scribe Animation: Fun way to learn and create stop animation using power of digital whiteboard. In this fun activity students will design and create digital story board and short commercials for TV. Join us in this exciting camp today.

 In this camp students will learn:

1)    How to draw and create character.

2)    Converting characters in to clipart using Illustrator and Inkscape

3)    Learn how to design movies based on bast seller children books.

4)    How to use digital white board

5)    How to record and synchronize voice

6)    Importing back ground and music

7)    Exporting movies

 

Cartoon Animation:

This camp is ideal for Elementary and Middle High School students. In this course, they will see their drawings come to life, as they learn the basic fundamentals of animation. By learning the basics of animation, one develops an understanding of motion, weight, balance, texture, color, and design. This will also promote the discipline and intensity required for studio work as one takes animated short films from concept to completion. Student will get access to Computer with all required tools and easy to follow application guided by professional artists. We will teach you how to draw and animate – easy and fun way ! also you will learn lots of short cuts and explore many ways to create and control animation. First week: Student will learn how to draw character on paper and directly on Computer using digital pen and pad. Through out week they will learn and develop skills of Digital Drawing for character building. Second Week: Students will learn and explore classical animation concept. While learning basics of animation they will develop short movies of walk cycle , jumped and anticipation. Third week: During this week student will work on special project and develop short movies based on technique they learned in last two weeks.

 

Path of Love

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Path of Love

Person is walking on path of love, in search of love. Line between person and heart indicates hidden connections and bright colors on canvas represents positive energy.

Painted with acrylic paint on opaque paste that develops crakes as it dries.

Artist: Jalal Gilani | 24X26, March 2014