What exactly is Manga?

One of our most popular classes at the studio is Manga Art. Kids love it! It really lets them get creative artistically and gives them the opportunity to create a dialog.

But what IS manga?

Manga is Japanese style art. In modern days it has become comparable to comic books. Some modern pop culture references are Pokemon, Sailor Moon, Dragon Ball Z, etc.

The origin of manga comes from the basic human desire of wanting to express and record – hence referring to the origins of manga as being that as fundamental as scribbles and doodles. The 20thC great master of mangaOsamu Tezuka is recorded to have stated that ‘manga begins from scribbles’. If one goes by this theory, we can argue that the origins of manga can stem as far back as the Stone Age scribbles on the cave walls. (Japanese Gallery, London)

Although manga started as scribbles and doodles it has evolved into a highly popular and profitable art form. There are manga t.v. shows, movies, and most common is comic books.

Similar to photography and cinematography, comic books were an art form that was not known in Japan before the 19th century. Folklore and mythology often represented famous historical scenes, and the idea of a narrative told by a sequel of images followed by an appropriate text was invented in the West.

The main difference between the first Western comic strips that started appearing in newspapers around 1900 and the Japanese manga was that the later lacked any political massage or intellectual criticism, which would be considered rude and offensive in Japan of the time.

The form, however, rapidly developed in an atmosphere of intellectual creativity of the ’20s and ’30s and one of the first manga magazines to be published in Japan –Shonen Club recorded sales of 900.000 copies as early as 1931. After the WWII, whereas American comics got restricted by the new censorship laws, mangaexploded into the most productive cultural industry of Japan, marking the aesthetics and visual concepts of the new generations.

What distinguished Japanese comic books from the rest of the world was actually the rich heritage of the traditional painting and craftsmanship, as suggested by the very title of the form. Centuries of sophisticated and complex print-making tradition manifested in the modern-day comic books by the selection of subjects as well as by the specific and particular use of perspective.

Thereupon, comics in Japan were always meant for everyone and dealt equally with the topics from everyday life same as with fantastic stories, while they were offering complete visual, almost cinematographic experience, with the text being used more as means of providing special effects in the background. The reason is that Japanese artists sometimes use more than 20 pages per single scene, thus visually presenting the entire event, which again can be put into a single sentence. Therefore, comics are not merely ‘read’ but more ‘seen’, an experience which is close to the understanding of Japanese language itself, which can be a reason for the initial development of a specific artistic preferences and therefore style in the first place. Keicichi Suyama, a manga researcher, states in the “Hisory of mangaJournal : World Edition 1972″ translates the word manga as Cartoon, or caricature.

Here a few student examples from the studio to get a visual!

Silhouette Art – What & Why?

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At the studio, we use silhouettes as a teaching tool for a variety of skills. Not only is this task simple enough for ages 5+, it is beautiful and teaches a lot. I’m going to give you the steps to make your own silhouette art and below I’ve outlined the skills you will acquire along the way!

Skill number 1: Simplifying an object. This sounds easy but it really can be difficult. You want to focus on the bare basics of your subject. Start by analyzing what are the most important and identifiable details about the subject. Once you have recognized those, you can start there. Not focusing on too much small detail. See the big picture.

Skill number 2: Drawing what you actually see. Most people have a set image in their head when they think of the item they are drawing. The key to a successful silhouette is erasing all preconceived notions of the object you are portraying. You need to be able to draw what you are actually seeing in front of your eyes. This way, your drawing will be easily identified after you have turned it into a silhouette.

Skill number 3: Lighting. Learning how to paint a silhouette and about the illusion you are creating can give insight into how you can use lighting to create a realistic work of art. By painting your image in complete black with an illuminated background this will give you a clue about where your light source is located and how that relates to shadows and colors.

Now you know the why, here is the what —->

STEP ONE: Think about your silhouette and come up with a sketch. Maybe it is something you can see in the room or something you have designed yourself. Sketch Sketch Sketch

STEP TWO: After you have your sketch complete you need to create a colorful background. Think about the silhouette you are making. What type of background would make sense? It is important that you pick a color scheme that makes sense and is appealing. *Use acrylic or watercolor paints for the background* LET DRY

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Above: Gracie being awesome 🙂

STEP THREE: Lightly sketch your silhouette over your dried background. Begin to use the black paint to color the silhouette image. Be sure to paint a ground and don’t be afraid of creative flare!

Your finished product should be colorful and make a cool illusion, just like Gracie’s.

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Cats Rule!

Visit our website at http://www.feelartistic.org

Clay Roses – Made Easy

Hand building with clay can be a tricky thing! It can be messy, but also lots of fun. One simple lesson we use to introduce the hand building process is clay roses. You can make them in any size and thickness and are a wonderful way to get used to the feel and malleability of stoneware clay.

First thing we do is pinch off and roll up different sized balls of clay, going biggest to smallest. Once you have them ready, flatten them out like the picture below.

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TOP: Step 1 BOTTOM: Step 2

Each flattened out clay ball is a rose petal. Next, you will place each petal slightly on top of the one next to it. Once every “petal” is touching, you start to roll the rose.

START WITH THE SMALLEST PETAL FIRST – roll smallest to largest.

Once you have all of the petals completely rolled in to each other you can pinch off any extra clay at the bottom of the rose. Sometimes it gets bulky towards the bottom and you can pinch to taper off the edge.

After you have your rose coiled you can smooth out any edges and make leaves to apply from the bottom. It sounds more complicated than it is!

Here is an example.

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After it is dried, it’s glazed and put in the kiln.

We love it and kids love it, roses made easy 🙂

Visit us at http://www.feelartistic.org

Animation camps for kids

Animation camps for kids at FEElartistic Studio

art classes and summer camps for kids

Jump start Animation Camps: This camps is for kids who are interested in making movies but don’t know how or where to begin. They will all about selected animation programs. These program will help them jump start their creativity. End of the program they will know which tools use and how to make movies. After the camp they can continue their journey from home computer

Clay Animations:

Combine the power of clay sculpting and magic of green screen with stop animation in most exciting way. This camp is for kids who are interested in making movies but don’t know how or where to begin.

Let’s join us to create your first stop animation movie.

In this camp students will learn:

1)    How to develop 3D character / model using Clay.

2)    How to use “Green Screen”.

3)    How to Draw and import shapes for background and masking

4)    What is voiceover and how to records and add in movie

5)    How to add titles

6)    Exporting movies and make it available to view.

 

Scribe Animation: Fun way to learn and create stop animation using power of digital whiteboard. In this fun activity students will design and create digital story board and short commercials for TV. Join us in this exciting camp today.

 In this camp students will learn:

1)    How to draw and create character.

2)    Converting characters in to clipart using Illustrator and Inkscape

3)    Learn how to design movies based on bast seller children books.

4)    How to use digital white board

5)    How to record and synchronize voice

6)    Importing back ground and music

7)    Exporting movies

 

Cartoon Animation:

This camp is ideal for Elementary and Middle High School students. In this course, they will see their drawings come to life, as they learn the basic fundamentals of animation. By learning the basics of animation, one develops an understanding of motion, weight, balance, texture, color, and design. This will also promote the discipline and intensity required for studio work as one takes animated short films from concept to completion. Student will get access to Computer with all required tools and easy to follow application guided by professional artists. We will teach you how to draw and animate – easy and fun way ! also you will learn lots of short cuts and explore many ways to create and control animation. First week: Student will learn how to draw character on paper and directly on Computer using digital pen and pad. Through out week they will learn and develop skills of Digital Drawing for character building. Second Week: Students will learn and explore classical animation concept. While learning basics of animation they will develop short movies of walk cycle , jumped and anticipation. Third week: During this week student will work on special project and develop short movies based on technique they learned in last two weeks.

 

Empty Space

“Drawing Empty Space”

Level:  All ages

Description: In the visual world, there are two aspects of any object. One is the form or figure and the other is space or non figure. It’s very interesting to know that when it comes to drawing visual objects with space, most people focus on drawing outlines and completely overlook empty space within and around the object.

To demonstrate, show an empty glass. Help children appreciate the fact that without the empty space inside and outside the glass, we would have no glass. Empty space is as important as the form of glass. You can not pour water into the glass if there is no space to contain it.

Materials: Pencils, Drawing Papers, Eraser, Ruler

Objects: Glass, Open Box, Bottles etc.

Activity:

Step 1. Display all objects.

Step 2. Ask kids to focus and study one of the objects carefully.

Step 3. Give average time for observation.

Step 4. Give drawing paper and pencil.

Step 5. Ask students to draw the outlines of the empty space, instead of drawing the outline of the form.

Step 6. Color empty space.

Step 7. Now ask students to draw only outlines of object on another drawing paper.

Step 8. Finally, ask them to merge empty space drawing and outlines of object on a separate drawing paper.

Creative Questions: Discuss this with the student.

1- Why are empty spaces important?

2- Name objects with empty spaces inside. For example, space between legs and arms. Space between tree limbs. Shapes between side facial features, such as the space between the nose and lips.

3- What is the difference between outer form and empty spaces?

Closing comments: By drawing these spaces, students will learn, how to draw what they see as they appreciate both the outline and the space.

Eight tips for selecting summer camps for kids.

When your kids are on vacation and you are busy, what can you do? Summer camps are normally the first thing that will come to your mind, but they bring many challenges for both kids and parents alike. Even with these challenges, summer wouldn’t be same without these camps for most families. Based on their time and their budget, some parents select full day camps for their kids in order to complement their work schedules and others go for short half day camps and even more still go for multiple daily activities. No matter if you select full day or half day camp, the most important thing is to select the right camp for your child, as well as one that that works for you.

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Above: FEELartistic art instructor Jalal Gilani at Marysville farm educates kids and parents alike

Following these simple tips will help you select the right camp and the best activities for your child:

1) Research camps in your neighborhood or close to your work so you can pick and drop your kids off on time.

2) I hope this one goes without saying, but don’t enroll your kids in same type of activities in same building or environment for the entire summer.

3) Request free classes as a trial of sorts. Some camps offer free trials, and it can’t hurt to ask!

I personally initiated a free art program at FEElartistic Studio for those interested in either taking weekly art classes or trying summer art camps. This will give an opportunity to parents to see if this camp is right for their child or not.

4) Make sure to read and understand the camp’s policies on late pick up and cancellation, just in case.

5) Search and read reviews of the camp, as they will give you a much deeper understanding of what exactly goes on in your camp of choice.

6) Meet the instructor ahead of time if possible, or learn about the instructor and about the company running the camps.

7) Look out for early registration. This can help you save up to 50% of summer camp costs if you’re lucky!

8) Make sure the institution organizing the camp has a business permit, insurance, and that the criminal background of each individual has been checked by an unbiased organization.

Good Luck and have a wonderful summer camps:)

JG-