PTA Reflection

PTA Reflection

(Sponsored by: Everett PTSA Council)

 

This year’s PTA Reflections prompt was about letting one’s imagination fly, a prompt that can be taken any number of ways. The versatility of a prompt such as this one is that students of all ages can give their own take on it: there were short stories about dragons and unicorns, drawings of hot air balloons and birds, pictures of wonder and ideas of discovery. I was pleasantly surprised by the art done with the medium of photography–there were some wonderful, creative works that I would never have thought of being brought to life in the form of a photo. The colors and spectacle in each piece of artwork made visiting this mini-exhibit completely worth it for me. It’s so inspiring to see children champion creativity over monotony!

Written by Rumi Gilani  

 

 

 

 

Clay Roses – Made Easy

Hand building with clay can be a tricky thing! It can be messy, but also lots of fun. One simple lesson we use to introduce the hand building process is clay roses. You can make them in any size and thickness and are a wonderful way to get used to the feel and malleability of stoneware clay.

First thing we do is pinch off and roll up different sized balls of clay, going biggest to smallest. Once you have them ready, flatten them out like the picture below.

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TOP: Step 1 BOTTOM: Step 2

Each flattened out clay ball is a rose petal. Next, you will place each petal slightly on top of the one next to it. Once every “petal” is touching, you start to roll the rose.

START WITH THE SMALLEST PETAL FIRST – roll smallest to largest.

Once you have all of the petals completely rolled in to each other you can pinch off any extra clay at the bottom of the rose. Sometimes it gets bulky towards the bottom and you can pinch to taper off the edge.

After you have your rose coiled you can smooth out any edges and make leaves to apply from the bottom. It sounds more complicated than it is!

Here is an example.

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After it is dried, it’s glazed and put in the kiln.

We love it and kids love it, roses made easy 🙂

Visit us at http://www.feelartistic.org

The Importance of Art in Child Development:

In recent years, school curricula in the United States have shifted heavily toward common core subjects of reading and math, but what about the arts? Although some may regard art education as a luxury, simple creative activities are some of the building blocks of child development. Learning to create and appreciate visual aesthetics may be more important than ever to the development of the next generation of children as they grow up.

Developmental Benefits of Art

Motor Skills: Many of the motions involved in making art, such as holding a paintbrush or scribbling with a crayon, are essential to the growth of fine motor skills in young children. According to the National Institutes of Health, developmental milestones around age three should include drawing a circle and beginning to use safety scissors. Around age four, children may be able to draw a square and begin cutting straight lines with scissors. Many preschool programs emphasize the use of scissors because it develops the dexterity children will need for writing.

Language Development: For very young children, making art—or just talking about it—provides opportunities to learn words for colors, shapes and actions. When toddlers are as young as a year old, parents can do simple activities such as crumpling up paper and calling it a “ball.” By elementary school, students can use descriptive words to discuss their own creations or to talk about what feelings are elicited when they see different styles of artwork.

Decision Making: According to a report by Americans for the Arts, art education strengthens problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. The experience of making decisions and choices in the course of creating art carries over into other parts of life. “If they are exploring and thinking and experimenting and trying new ideas, then creativity has a chance to blossom,” says MaryAnn Kohl, an arts educator and author of numerous books about children’s art education.

Visual Learning: Drawing, sculpting with clay and threading beads on a string all develop visual-spatial skills, which are more important than ever. Even toddlers know how to operate a smart phone or tablet, which means that even before they can read, kids are taking in visual information. This information consists of cues that we get from pictures or three-dimensional objects from digital media, books and television.

“Parents need to be aware that children learn a lot more from graphic sources now than in the past,” says Dr. Kerry Freedman, Head of Art and Design Education at Northern Illinois University. “Children need to know more about the world than just what they can learn through text and numbers. Art education teaches students how to interpret, criticize, and use visual information, and how to make choices based on it.” Knowledge about the visual arts, such as graphic symbolism, is especially important in helping kids become smart consumers and navigate a world filled with marketing logos.

Inventiveness: When kids are encouraged to express themselves and take risks in creating art, they develop a sense of innovation that will be important in their adult lives. “The kind of people society needs to make it move forward are thinking, inventive people who seek new ways and improvements, not people who can only follow directions,” says Kohl. “Art is a way to encourage the process and the experience of thinking and making things better!”

Cultural Awareness: As we live in an increasingly diverse society, the images of different groups in the media may also present mixed messages. “If a child is playing with a toy that suggests a racist or sexist meaning, part of that meaning develops because of the aesthetics of the toy—the color, shape, texture of the hair,” says Freedman. Teaching children to recognize the choices an artist or designer makes in portraying a subject helps kids understand the concept that what they see may be someone’s interpretation of reality.

Improved Academic Performance: Studies show that there is a correlation between art and other achievement. A report by Americans for the Arts states that young people who participate regularly in the arts (three hours a day on three days each week through one full year) are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, to participate in a math and science fair or to win an award for writing an essay or poem than children who do not participate.

By Grace Hwang Lynch

For more information visit:  http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/music-arts/the-importance-of-art-in-child-development

Animation camps for kids

Animation camps for kids at FEElartistic Studio

art classes and summer camps for kids

Jump start Animation Camps: This camps is for kids who are interested in making movies but don’t know how or where to begin. They will all about selected animation programs. These program will help them jump start their creativity. End of the program they will know which tools use and how to make movies. After the camp they can continue their journey from home computer

Clay Animations:

Combine the power of clay sculpting and magic of green screen with stop animation in most exciting way. This camp is for kids who are interested in making movies but don’t know how or where to begin.

Let’s join us to create your first stop animation movie.

In this camp students will learn:

1)    How to develop 3D character / model using Clay.

2)    How to use “Green Screen”.

3)    How to Draw and import shapes for background and masking

4)    What is voiceover and how to records and add in movie

5)    How to add titles

6)    Exporting movies and make it available to view.

 

Scribe Animation: Fun way to learn and create stop animation using power of digital whiteboard. In this fun activity students will design and create digital story board and short commercials for TV. Join us in this exciting camp today.

 In this camp students will learn:

1)    How to draw and create character.

2)    Converting characters in to clipart using Illustrator and Inkscape

3)    Learn how to design movies based on bast seller children books.

4)    How to use digital white board

5)    How to record and synchronize voice

6)    Importing back ground and music

7)    Exporting movies

 

Cartoon Animation:

This camp is ideal for Elementary and Middle High School students. In this course, they will see their drawings come to life, as they learn the basic fundamentals of animation. By learning the basics of animation, one develops an understanding of motion, weight, balance, texture, color, and design. This will also promote the discipline and intensity required for studio work as one takes animated short films from concept to completion. Student will get access to Computer with all required tools and easy to follow application guided by professional artists. We will teach you how to draw and animate – easy and fun way ! also you will learn lots of short cuts and explore many ways to create and control animation. First week: Student will learn how to draw character on paper and directly on Computer using digital pen and pad. Through out week they will learn and develop skills of Digital Drawing for character building. Second Week: Students will learn and explore classical animation concept. While learning basics of animation they will develop short movies of walk cycle , jumped and anticipation. Third week: During this week student will work on special project and develop short movies based on technique they learned in last two weeks.

 

Path of Love

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Path of Love

Person is walking on path of love, in search of love. Line between person and heart indicates hidden connections and bright colors on canvas represents positive energy.

Painted with acrylic paint on opaque paste that develops crakes as it dries.

Artist: Jalal Gilani | 24X26, March 2014

Empty Space

“Drawing Empty Space”

Level:  All ages

Description: In the visual world, there are two aspects of any object. One is the form or figure and the other is space or non figure. It’s very interesting to know that when it comes to drawing visual objects with space, most people focus on drawing outlines and completely overlook empty space within and around the object.

To demonstrate, show an empty glass. Help children appreciate the fact that without the empty space inside and outside the glass, we would have no glass. Empty space is as important as the form of glass. You can not pour water into the glass if there is no space to contain it.

Materials: Pencils, Drawing Papers, Eraser, Ruler

Objects: Glass, Open Box, Bottles etc.

Activity:

Step 1. Display all objects.

Step 2. Ask kids to focus and study one of the objects carefully.

Step 3. Give average time for observation.

Step 4. Give drawing paper and pencil.

Step 5. Ask students to draw the outlines of the empty space, instead of drawing the outline of the form.

Step 6. Color empty space.

Step 7. Now ask students to draw only outlines of object on another drawing paper.

Step 8. Finally, ask them to merge empty space drawing and outlines of object on a separate drawing paper.

Creative Questions: Discuss this with the student.

1- Why are empty spaces important?

2- Name objects with empty spaces inside. For example, space between legs and arms. Space between tree limbs. Shapes between side facial features, such as the space between the nose and lips.

3- What is the difference between outer form and empty spaces?

Closing comments: By drawing these spaces, students will learn, how to draw what they see as they appreciate both the outline and the space.

Animated version of Allama Iqbal ‘s beautiful poem “Hamdardi” (Sympathy)

Video

Frame animated story for kids based on Sir Muhammad Iqbal’s urdu poetry “Hamdardi” means Sympathy. Adapted for Children from William Cowper.

Narrated in Urdu with English annotation.

English Translation:
Perched on the branch of a tree
Was a nightingale sad and lonely

“The night has drawn near”, He was thinking
“I passed the day in flying around and feeding

How can I reach up to the nest
Darkness has enveloped everything”?

Hearing the nightingale wailing thus
A glow‐worm lurking nearby spoke thus

“With my heart and soul ready to help I am
Though only an insignificant insect I am

Never mind if the night is dark
I shall shed light if the way is dark

God has bestowed a torch on me
He has given a shining lamp to me

The good in the world only those are
Ready to be useful to others who are